Taking Action for Our Health

Prediabetes: Monitor

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Talk to your doctor about screening, or take the test and know your score!

If you are between 35 and 70 years old and are either overweight or obese, talk to your health care provider about being screened for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes [USPSTF citation]. You can also complete the CDC Prediabetes Screening Test (citation). This screener is used to assess risk for prediabetes, but it is not diagnostic. Learn more about prediabetes at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

If your score is 3 to 8 points

This means your risk is probably low for having prediabetes now. Keep your risk low. If you're overweight, lose weight. Be active most days, and don't use tobacco. Eat low-fat meals with fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, talk to your health care provider about your risk for type 2 diabetes.

If your score is 9 or more points

This means your risk is high for having prediabetes now. Please make an appointment with your health care provider soon.

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Know that you're not alone. Chances are, you're not the only one in your family, among your friends or community who is managing your risk for this disease. Finding out if you're at risk is the first step in being healthy. Getting help is the next step.


It can be hard to find social services to help with your physical and emotional health. TakeAction is a social care network that connects people and programs – making it easy for you to find the social services you need in your community.


Here are some other resources:

  • TakeAction: For most people, navigating the system to get help is difficult, time consuming and frustrating. TakeAction is a social care network that connects people and programs – making it easy for people to find the social services they need in their community.
  • Individual or group health insurance members: See your doctor. If you don't have a doctor, visit your insurance plan's website to find a doctor near you. Most insurance providers have a "Find Doctor" feature on their websites.
  • Medicaid members: See your doctor. If you don't have a doctor, contact a state Medicaid office, or contact your local health department.
  • Medicare members: See your doctor. Medicare will pay the cost of testing if the doctor has a reason for testing. If you don't have a doctor, contact your local health department.

Here are some additional online tools to help you find a doctor or nurse in your community:

  • HRSA Health Centers. Contact HRSA to make an appointment (877-464-4772). HRSA provides care even if you have no health insurance. Open weekdays 8am to 8pm Eastern Time (except federal holidays).

EN Tip: click the "Download reminder" button to add a calendar event to your device's calendar (iCal format). This reminder will be set for 30 days from today, and will repeat annually.

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